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Coffee Rubbed Steak

Coffee Rubbed Steak

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Perhaps you’re thinking, “Rachel, your coffee addiction has gone too far!”  I’ll admit that putting coffee on steak sounds pretty weird if not down right wrong.  That is, until you try it!  Everyone that tries this steak is pleasantly surprised at how delicious it is and it doesn’t even taste like coffee.  

Coffee rubbed steak has a delicious coating of coffee and spices that mingle together to make the most delicious steak ever!  

The products in this post were compensated.  All opinions are my own.

I’m typically a steak purest.  If I am hankering for a steak then I usually just like it cooked to perfection with a sprinkle of salt and maybe a dollop of butter.  Now that I’ve tried a coffee rubbed steak it’s my go to steak preference.  There is just something about that crusted coffee rub on top that is so good. 

Coffee Crusted Rubbed Steak

One of the best things about this recipe is that it works on most cuts of steak.  I used certified angus beef rib eye steaks because I love a good tender steak.  The contrast between the crusty coating and the tender beef is perfection! 

Coffee Rubbed Steak on pan

My favorite way of cooking a coffee rubbed steak is by cooking it in a very hot cast iron skillet. The oil from the meat essentially “fries” the coating on top and gives the coffee rub a nice little crust.  It’s not enough of a crust to say that it is crunchy, but it adds just a bit of texture to the top.  

Coffee Rubbed Steak on plate cooked

It’s just really hard in words to describe what this tastes like.  The coffee rub is not overly spiced which really brings out the steak flavor as the dominate flavor.  This coffee rub brings in a nice finishing touch to any steak! 

Delicious coffee rubbed steak

I like to top off my steak with a little butter.  This steak honestly doesn’t need anything else, but butter is always welcome!  I ended up using the butter for my asparagus more than my steak, though, because I really just wanted more of the coffee rub. 

Coffee Rubbed Steak

Tips and FAQs about Coffee Rubbed or Coffee Crusted Steak.

  1. What does coffee rubbed steak taste like?  Coffee rubbed steak has a little bit of a charred taste, but much more subtle than a grilled steak.  The taste will depend a lot on the other ingredients that you use in the rub.  This coffee rub recipe uses chili, smoked paprika and cumin to bring in some delicious spices to the mix. 
  2. Why rub coffee on steak?  Coffee is an easy way to bring a little extra flavor and texture to a steak.  Some people taste a hint of coffee flavor, but I can’t really taste it once it’s cooked.  It’s more of a slightly charred taste with and amazing crust like texture.  
  3. What to serve with coffee rubbed steak?  Any sides that you would normally serve with a tender seared steak will be great.  Some suggestions are:

    • mashed potatoes,
    • scalloped potatoes,
    • steamed asparagus,
    • steamed broccoli or a
    • baked potato. 
  1. Can you grill a coffee rubbed steak?  You can grill a coffee rubbed steak if you want to, but the best preparation is in a skillet on a stovetop.  The reason for this is that the fat in the meat starts to fry the coating and gives it that unique flavor.  The fat of the meat when cooked on the grill will often just drip down the grill and won’t be quite the same.  
  2. What kind of coffee is best for coffee rubbed steak?  It’s best to use a medium to dark roast of coffee.  The type of coffee doesn’t matter as long as it’s one that you like.  We used arabica beans from Sumatra, but I’ve heard Kona coffee is good too.  Honestly, the grind is the most important part.  You want the grind to be as fine as possible without it becoming a powder.  

Coffee Rubbed Steak

Coffee Rubbed Steak is seriously life changing.  I’m not sure I could top this preparation for steak because it’s definitely my new favorite!  Have you tried coffee rubbed steak?  What’s holding you back if not?  

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Coffee Rubbed Steak Recipe

Coffee rubbed steak has a delicious coating of coffee and spices that mingle together to make the most delicious steak ever!  This easy coffee rub is great for most steaks, but our favorites are rib-eyes and strip steaks.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time8 mins
rest5 mins
Total Time13 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: coffee rubbed steak
Author: Rachel

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp. finely ground coffee (I use a dark roast) fresh ground coffee preferred
  • 1 tbsp. sugar (you can omit this if watching carbs)
  • 2 tsp. seasoning salt (I use Lawry's)
  • 1 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 2 tbsp. chili seasoning mix (I used McCormick from a packet)
  • 2 1 inch thick steaks (tender cuts preferred) ribeye is what I like to use

Instructions

  • In a small bowl combine the dry rub ingredients (except steaks) and mix well.  Lay the steaks on a large plate and coat them completely with the coffee rub.  Heat a large skillet (cast iron is preferred) on high heat with a thin coating of oil if not non stick.  Place steaks in skillet and cook on high each side for at least 4 minutes or longer depending on how well done you like the steaks.  Take the steaks off heat and let them rest covered in foil for 5 minutes before cutting into them.  Serve after resting.  Enjoy! 

Notes

Steak temps and levels of doneness. 
Rare
Cool red center
125° F52° C
Medium Rare
Warm red center
135° F57° C
Medium
Warm pink center
145° F63° C
Medium Well
Slightly pink center
150° F66° C
Well Done
Little or no pink
The USDA recommends steaks and roasts be cooked to 145°F (medium) and then rested for at least 3 minutes. To ensure food safety, ground beef should be cooked to a minimum 160°F (well done). Be sure to check with a thermometer, as color alone is not a foolproof indicator.
Recipe Rating




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